DIS2020

More than Human Centred Design

Demonstrations

Ivy: A Qualitative Interface to Reduce Sedentary Behavior in the Office Context

  • Daphne Menheere, Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands
  • Ida Damen, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands
  • Carine Lallemand, Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Human-Computer Interaction research group, University of Luxembourg, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
  • Steven Vos, Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands; School of Sport Studies, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, Netherlands
  • Corresponding email(s): d.s.menheere@tue.nl
  • Project webpage
  • Research group webpage
  • ACM DL Link: Extended Abstract

Your office day is full of choices. Often, sitting is a very subconscious choice. It is something we do without thinking, for hours on end. Our increasingly sedentary lifestyles are a growing health risk, with physical inactivity as the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, a multitude of health interventions for the office context has been developed over recent years. However, a current trend in health interventions is that everything is transformed into numbers and graphs. You have an app that will give you a notification when you reach your daily step goal, you can get a detailed overview of your sleep quality in minutes of REM sleep, and you get a prompting message if you have been sitting for too long. In this demonstration, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions by letting you experience our design ‘Ivy’. Enjoy this interactive demonstration.

Who is the target audience and why design for them? With our work we aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction on the use qualitative interfaces in health interventions. We believe qualitative interfaces are a promising approach to deepen the user’s relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the intervention's feedback.

What were the challenges or limitations encountered in this project? A digital demonstration asks for a different approach compared to a live demonstration. We tried to make our demo video as close to our initial idea as possible by making it interactive. This proved to be a fun but time-consuming endeavor.

What are the opportunities and next steps for this project? Further work needs to be done to establish whether the design of Ivy actually enables a better understanding of the intervention and enriches the ability to construct meaning from the feedback.

To the Demo Visitors: We’re interested in your perspective on qualitative interface use in health interventions. Please reach out to us by emailing Daphne Menheere or Ida Damen at d.s.menheere@tue.nl or a.a.j.m.damen@tue.nl.